Greenhorn, Oregon

Mining Ghost Town

Greenhorn, Oregon Ghost Town

Greenhorn is perhaps the most picturesque of all the ghost towns surviving in Eastern Oregon. Nestled amongst lodgepole pines and grassy underbrush, it has a wealth of cabins and buildings still standing  If you look closely, you can even find the original bank building.  

 

Greenhorn is beautiful and authentic at the same time.  It  is absolutely worth a visit.  

History

A first settlement very near to Greenhorn named Robinsonville was established in 1865 but burned in 1898.  The current town of Greenhorn was inhabited as early as 1900 and Greenhorn was deeded in 1912.

 

According to Howard Brooks in his excellent work on mining history in Eastern Oregon:

 

“ During its boom days, 1910-1915, the city of Greenhorn housed two hotels, a post office, waterworks including fire hydrants, a number of general merchandise and grocery stores, several saloons, one house of prostitution, and later a wooden jail.”

 

Today, Greenhorn boasts the highest elevation of any incorporated city in Oregon (6,306 feet), and also the lowest population (zero!).  A pay telephone was recently installed in the town of Greenhorn, so things must be on the up-swing for the town of Greenhorn!

 

A little known fact is that there are actually several additional buildings just off the beaten path from the central area of Greenhorn.  We’ve taken pictures of them here.  See if you can find them!

To Get There

    • From the town of Sumpter, head south on Highway 410.
    • Continue on Highway 410 for 3 miles
    • Once you reach the T with Highway 7, turn right.
    • Follow Highway 7 for 30 miles.
    • Take a right on Greenhorn Road, road 503B
    • Follow Greenhorn Road 6 miles until you reach the town of Greenhorn.

This is far the fastest route from Sumpter, though you can also access Greenhorn from the north if you are coming from the Granite area.  In this case, make sure you have the North Fork John Day Ranger District map, produced by the USFS.

OUR COMMITMENT

The Friends of the Sumpter Valley Dredge is committed to maintaining the history of the dredge for today, tomorrow, and for future generations to learn and enjoy.

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